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« Giving and Receiving Train Wreck | Main | The Point Radio: Air Force One Solutions »

November 27, 2007

Daily roundup

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Steve (SBK)

I'm a huge fan of C.S. Lewis. (Oooh. Stepping out on a limb there Steve.)
I notice that "That Hideous Strength" is not appreciated much by many people, but one aspect I enjoyed was the "Planetary influence" in the book. (Along with its themes reflecting Lewis's thought in "The Abolition of Man"). All that to say, I'm extremely excited to read Michael Ward's "Planet Narnia" when it's released (See the link "Narnia's Secret")...
Sometimes I do wonder what kind of spiritual and symbolic depth we have forgotten or are missing out on because of our "bridling the stars".

Gina Dalfonzo

I got to hear Michael Ward give a talk on his theory a few years ago. Fascinating stuff. You're right, Steve, this should be a good book.

jason taylor


I don't think "fine, thanks" is a lie. I think it's a noncommital. Words have to be understood in their context and in this context it is simply the accepted reply. Taking it as necessarily meaning he is fine is like believing a Trekie is contemplating suicide because he says, "today is a good day to die."

Steve (SBK)

I agree Jason.
Context, Expectation, Category.
How am I? Physically? In relation to the question asker? etc.
Still, I don't doubt that practicing untruth can be a slippery slope. (i.e. willfully deceiving someone who's expecting more than surface/social pleasantries).

Jason Taylor

As far as Three Musketers having no "kappa" I wouldn't know as I never read the book. However Court intrigue in the early modern era has tremendous potential for "kappa" with the mixture of splendour, decadence and dark plots and counterplots. If Alexander Dumas couldn't do it either he didn't know how or that wasn't his intention. I know I got the feeling I described from Prisoner of Zenda.

Jason Taylor

Actually my favorite book for "Kappa"(Narnia's Secret)is not a fiction but a history. Istanbul Intrigues by Barry Rubin.
http://www.amazon.com/Istanbul-Intrigues-True-Life-Casablanca-Barry/dp/0070542007/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1197077250&sr=8-4

It is about Istanbul during the war and is marvelous for giving atmosphere. The image it gives is of the ageless city, an island in the midst of chaos all about, full of old-world elegance but underneth seething with a hidden war between every power, big or little, in the Meditteranean. It haunted me from the moment I opened it. The writer may have missed his calling-he should have written spy-stories.

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