- List All


  • Web   The Point

Blogroll

+ Theology/Religion + Culture + Marriage & Family + Politics + Academia + Human Rights
Christianity Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
Religion Blogs - Blog Top Sites
Link With Us - Web Directory



« Re: Betrayal | Main | Blog-a-Book: ’Not for any gains’ »

August 28, 2007

Different does not mean bad

Over at Wittingshire, Amanda Witt shares two very different stories of children with Down syndrome: Olivia and Daniel. Both stories make clear that it's the people who think these children have nothing to offer, who would rather dispose of them than make the time and effort to care about them, who are the losers. Sadly, as Amanda writes, "For all our culture's emphasis on diversity and tolerance, that's a truth too few of us really know."

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c635553ef00e54ee7d2e88834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Different does not mean bad:

Comments

CGG

I've noticed that often times on the blog's lead in story, there is no link to the story they reference. Could you please provide one? Thank you.

Gina Dalfonzo

The links are there, CGG. They're on the words "Olivia" and "Daniel," which should appear in a slightly different color on your screen.

Dennis Babish

Gina I have a nephew with Downs and he has been a blessing in both my wife's and my life.
It is easier for us as we don't have to take care of him, only enjoy the time we have with him. But my sister-in-law has considered him her joy from the day he was born which was about 20 years ago.
Unfortunately what is being promoted as diversity and tolerance is actually sameness and intolerance.
Those with Downs have as much of a purpose in this life as those that don't have Downs.

labrialumn

I agree with Dennis. "Diversity" and "Multiculturalism" aren't about exposure and appreciation of other cultures and ideas. It is about obliterating and disenfranchising the ideas and culture that gave rise to our former freedoms here in America.

Taking education classes is, well, enlightening. As is subbing in the public schools and seeing what is actually in the materials that teachers are required to teach.

The comments to this entry are closed.